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BC coroners service

Providing young people with the everyday tools and skills to support mental well-being and ensuring that health professionals have clear and accessible mental health practice and treatment guidelines are among the key recommendations of a death review panel into child and youth suicides.

The panel identified three key areas to reduce child and youth suicide deaths and improve public safety:

* Adopt mental well-being strategies as part of social-emotional learning for students;

* Identify and distribute provincial best practice youth mental health guidelines; and

* Expand youth mental health services, including psychiatric services, to non-urban areas through outreach models.

The death review panel, chaired by Michael Egilson, included 19-panel experts with expertise in youth services, child welfare, mental health, addictions, medicine, nursing, public health, Indigenous health, injury prevention, education, income support, law enforcement, and health research. The panel's recommendations are aimed at preventing death in similar circumstances and improving public safety overall.

"Suicide is the leading cause of injury-related death among children and youth in B.C.," Egilson said. "Almost 70% of serious mental health issues emerge before the age of 25. Programs directed at children in schools and best practice guidelines for health-care providers providing diagnosis and services are important in preventing these deaths.

The BC Coroners Service also provided some statistics on youth suicide.

* Each year in B.C., approximately 20 children and youth die by suicide;

* Of the 111 deaths studied during the review, three times more males died by suicide than females;

* This review found more suicide deaths occurred among older adolescents with 86% of the suicides occurring among youth ages 15 to 18 years.

* This review found higher rates of youth suicide for residents of rural health authorities (Interior, Island, and Northern regional health authorities).

* The Interior Health Authority had almost two times the rate of child and youth suicides as compared to the B.C. rate.

Interior Health does have a full-time team based in Merritt out at the Hospital for assessment and treatment for mental health and substance abuse issues. The team also works together with the emergency team at the hospital to respond to possible urgent calls.

 

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On Twitter: @Q101Merritt

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August 16, 2019

 

The staff and family of Q101 are deeply saddened by the sudden passing of former afternoon announcer Jesse Pakulat on August 15th.

Jesse was afternoon announcer from 2016 to 2019 and made many deep community connections in Merritt and the Nicola Valley during his time on the air.

Along with family, friends and listeners who are mourning his loss, MerrittBroadcasting will also respect the wishes of Jesse’s family for privacy at this time.

 

Sincerely,

Elizabeth Laird

General Manager

Merritt Broadcasting Ltd.

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Most Wanted Aug 15

Every weekend Q101 will revisit the most talked-about stories of the week in Merritt and bring them to you all in one place. As well as my favourite story of the week.

This week Merritt was talking about Merritt’s most wanted, council remuneration, and drought.

Merritt’s Most Wanted

Merritt RCMP has released their most wanted list. The following individuals have outstanding arrest warrants. 

Full Story

Council Remuneration Changes Proceed

The crux of the bylaw is to bring the council’s and Mayor’s salaries on par with like-sized communities across the province. 
 
The proposed raise would see the Mayor earn $36,582 and Councillors $17,394. Currently Mayor Linda Brown is making $25,984 and Council $15,590.

Full Story

Drought Leads to Stricter Watering Restrictions for Merritt Residents

In consultation with the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations, the City of Merritt is further increasing watering restrictions. The Coldwater Basin is the driest area in BC and sits at Drought Level 4 (Extremely Dry).

Full Story

My favourite story is week was about steps being taken inhouse at City Hall to reduce single-use plastics.

Mayor Brown Investigates Reducing Single-use Plastic at City Hall

Here in Merritt reducing single-use plastics has long been on Mayor Linda Brown’s radar. While she’s not prepared to come to the Council table looking for a city-wide ban, Mayor Brown did mention taking some internal steps first.

Full Story

 

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On Twitter: @Q101Merritt

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Merritt Map Boundary
 
Recently the City of Merritt was approached by the Thompson Nicola Regional District (TNRD) about beginning to investigate a possible boundary expansion focused around the festival site.
 
This week City Council approved a recommendation that will allow Staff to potentially spend up to $15,000 to investigate the ramifications.
 
“I’m absolutely delighted that we’ll be examining some options, that when we can ask the questions, what the benefit is to Merritt, are there any drawbacks to Merritt, what are the potential areas that we’re talking about. So, I think it’s high time we get on with it,” said Coun. Kurt Christopherson.
 
Sean Smith, Director of Corporate Services, mentioned how early indication from TNRD has zero residential properties involved.
 
The scoping study could cost as much as $15,000 but Smith admitted that number could vary.
 
“Depending on the scope of what the TNRD is wanting us to look at bringing into our boundaries, if it’s a small part it’s wholly possible that staff could do that research without spending any money. If the scope is larger, that’s when we’d look towards having a scoping study done,” said Smith.
 
It should be noted that the property owner would have to agree to be incorporated into Merritt.

 

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City hall
 
The City of Merritt has been working to improve flood mitigation at three key points along the river.
 
One of those spots is the pedestrian bridge at Lions Park. James Dinwoodie, Director of Engineering & Development, spoke to the unusual development.
 
“The Lions park pedestrian bridge was constructed in 1980 and it crosses the Nicola River. Unfortunately, when they built the bridge, they forgot to ask for crown land tenure over the river canal. So, although we built the bridge, we did it illegally,” said Dinwoodie.
 
Due to this fact, the Ministry is requesting that the City apply for the proper tenure over the river. Dinwoodie mentioned how that process could take upwards of two years.
 
During the recent heavy flooding years, the bridge was almost washed away, which has led the department to look at raising the bridge.
 
“By raising the bridge we’re going to increase the capacity of the river canal so it would be able to handle more flood events in the future,” said Dinwoodie.
 
Luckily the City doesn’t have to wait for tenure to improve, and repair the bridge as the Ministry is expected to allow the work to occur this winter when the river is partly frozen.

 

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